Nothing Lies Like a Statistic, But These Numbers Speak The Truth

Getting ready to move again. When I left Athens in August 2014, I was sad. I was leaving my home of seven years. The place where I celebrated some of my greatest successes and licked some of my deepest wounds. I had friends all over town, family near by. This was where I first lived alone. This was where I first lived with an other of significance. This was where I turned 21. This was a town of so many firsts. It was very sad.

I am admittedly less sad to leave the Big Rock Candy Mountain (BRCM). I’ve mentioned this before…it’s been rough. It’s a small town with very few people in my age-range, and with very few “non-colleagues” (which, whether it should or shouldn’t, makes it difficult to relax). I’ve all but purposefully tried not to be attached to this place because I knew from the start I would have to leave and would have to all-but-kill-myself to get another job.

Still, as I pack everything I own into boxes, I can’t help but think of the last almost-two years. Here are some interesting numbers concerning August 2014–May 2016 job-wise:

  • 8–the number of classes (counting repeated preps) I was scheduled to teach.
  • 9–the number of distinct courses I actually taught.
  • 10–the number of courses (counting repeated preps) I actually taught.
  • 16–the number of letters of recommendation I wrote.
  • 1–the number of honors theses led.
  • 6–the number of thank-you notes/gift-packages received from students.
  • 6–the number of times I got to wear my robe, hood, and “doctoral tam”
  • 63–the approximate number of consecutive days where “all” I had to think about was research (with undergrads)
  • 121–the number of jobs I applied for as I prepared to leave the BRCM.
  • 15–the number of first-round interviews I had in a three-day period (plus 5 more).
  • 12–the number of conferences and workshops I attended (speaking at 6 of them).
  • 5–the number of additional seminar talks I gave.
  • 3–the number of papers accepted.
  • 1–the number of grants received (yay)
  • 1–the number of conferences (co)-organized (meh)
  • 1–the number of papers submitted (ouch)
  • 0–number of times no one came to office hours.
  • 90–the minimum percent of days where my students were the highlight of my day.

All work and no play, right? Well, here are some stats about the BRCM itself:

  • 40–the approximate number of days it literally rained worms.
  • 75–the approximate number of minutes the local coffee shop is open before any food arrives.
  • 3–the number of months (all during winter) which passed between my heater breaking and my heater getting fixed.
  • 0–the number of times I went somewhere in town and did not run into a student or colleague.
  • 4–number of miles to the closest business with a drive thru (it’s a fast food place too. Not even a bank, or a drug store, or dry cleaner).
  • 6–the minimum number of churches you’d pass driving from my house to said drive thru (mapquest is fantastic).
  • 2–the number of days I made it into the big city 27 miles away for a reason other than work.
  • 90–the minimum percent of days where I felt like I did not fit in and/or was not welcome.

And last (also, perhaps least) my personal life:

  • 38–the number of books I read for fun.
  • 18–the approximate number of on-campus events I attended for fun.
  • 3–the number of OK Cupid first dates.
  • 1–the number of OK Cupid second dates.
  • 0–the number of OK Cupid third dates.
  • 60–approximate number of days I spent “home” in Atlanta.
  • 4–the number of trips I made to my “second home” in Athens.
  • 665–the number of square feet by which I downsized moving from Athens to the BRCM
  • 665–the approximate max square footage of an apartment I can afford in my next city.
  • 3–the number of times my parents came to visit me in the BCRM.
  • 1–the number of friends who visited and stayed with me in the BRCM
  • 0–number of vacations I had.
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